Archives December 2019

The actual situation of gender discrimination alarm in Southeast Asia

One of ASEAN’s main goals set for the Socio-Cultural Community is to improve the quality of education and training for people, with special attention to the field of sex education, thereby contributing to promoting socio-economic development and gender equality.


In an article in the Jakarta Globe, Yoriko Yasukawa, Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in the Asia-Pacific region highlighted the alarming realities of gender discrimination and receipt of gender constraints in ASEAN member countries, and make recommendations to improve this gloomy picture.

According to Yasukawa, as of 2015, ASEAN countries have about 164 million teenagers aged 10-24 years and this number is expected to increase to over 166 million by 2030.

Due to the Asian conception, gender issues are still limited in school and this is one of the reasons why gender discrimination is still severe in Southeast Asia.

1

In regional countries, only 58% of women work, while this rate for men is 82%.

In addition, the income gap between the sexes is quite large. For example, women in Cambodia and Singapore earn just 25% of men’s income.

In Southeast Asian countries today there are about 27 million adolescents aged 15-19. About 35% of these people get married early, 18% of girls give birth when they are under 20 years old.

This fact is very worrying because of the impact on the quality of the population when the mother is too young, lacking experience in living and caring for young children, and is unable to afford economy. In addition to domestic violence, more than 40% of adolescent girls in at least 3 ASEAN countries think domestic violence is acceptable.

About 34% of women admitted to being victims of physical and mental violence while living with their husbands or in-laws.

All the above figures show that comprehensive sex education in ASEAN countries needs to be more widely disseminated to help young people approach and share their situation.

The Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in the Asia-Pacific region said that governments need to pay serious attention to comprehensive sex education, to help young people with knowledge. It is necessary to help them protect themselves and gradually eliminate the idea of ​​gender discrimination in all areas of life.

Southeast Asian governments must set clear goals and commit to effectively implement this issue. This issue must be taken seriously as the economic development goals of each country.

2

School educational programs need to be reformed, the school environment should be more comprehensive.

In addition, businesses, as socio-economic organizations, support the government in achieving this goal by giving public support and actively participating in problem-solving dialogues. this.

Southeast Asian countries need to join hands for the future of the young generation, for the future of each nation and for the future of the whole of Southeast Asia.

2 leading countries in the budget for education investment

The quality of education is one of the criteria that govern the progress of an individual, or a society, as well as the development of an entire nation.


Therefore, living in a country with a high investment rate in education will surely make a difference in the lives of any student.

Let’s take a look at the four countries of the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) that currently have the largest level of investment in education in the world, to see the importance of this field to the development of every country.

England

Considered one of the most outstanding educational countries in the international academic community, the UK has always been a potential and favorite destination for international students.

According to the document “Education at a Glance 2017: OECD Indicators” – published by OCED, the UK is ranked in the list of countries with the highest investment indicators for education in 2014 – with about 6.6% from GDP is set aside as an investment budget for all levels of education from primary to tertiary.

The UK is also known for investing millions of pounds in children’s education and promoting social mobility (- promoting the personal and social development of many communities, directly contributing to the community on improving population productivity and boosting the country’s economic growth.).

According to a document published by the British government’s official website in August 2018, the country is undertaking an initiative focused on supporting early childhood education and development. In addition, the report reveals that the government is investing a £30 million fund into a social action plan to create high-quality kindergartens for children’s education.

Denmark

For this European nation, investment in education has become a machine for social, economic and human development.

According to data provided by the OECD in 2014, Denmark spent 6.5% of its GDP on the education sector, of which 4.5% was for primary and secondary education – this is considered the the highest investment in the region.

The Danish government considers investing in primary and secondary education the most important, as this is the necessary period to build and improve students’ awareness before going to university. These are also two compulsory levels for children from 6 to 17 years old.

Education in Denmark is almost entirely subsidized by the government. In addition, there are still training programs, private universities and fee collection.

For higher education, the monthly student support policy is a positive but controversial policy within the government. Despite the criticism, this policy is maintained by the success and international reputation that Danish education has gained over the years.

The success of educational management in this Nordic country is due to the cooperation between the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation. These are the two agencies that are jointly responsible for designing and planning the implementation of educational programs with the participation of teachers and students who directly influence the quality of the training and its quality.